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Marine Corps Training Day

A typical day of training for the Marines starts at five o’clock in the morning and is jam-packed with physical training and Marine Corps history. Learn about a typical day of Marine Corps boot camp with information from a staff sergeant in this free video from the United States Marine Corps.

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A Few Good Men

A Marine Corps slogan that is still in use today is that the Marines are “Looking For A Few Good Men.”

In 1779, USMC Capt. William Jones let it be known that he was looking for “a few good men” to serve onboard ship.

The slogan has survived for over 200 years, in spite of it being politically incorrect in today’s jargon.

Of course, this was roughly 150 years before women started to serve in the Marine Corps.

Otherwise my daughter wouldn’t have earned the title United States Marine

So the Corps is obviously looking for a few good women as well.

I’m surprised some equal-rights extremist hasn’t accused the Corps of being sexist.

Holly Dress Blues

Marine Corps Boot Camp Letters 2

For the next few Throw Back Thursdays, I plan on re-printing letters we received from Holly when she was a recruit at Parris Island. This is the first of many. If you want to be sure to see more, subscribe to the blog and/or send a friend request.

She mentioned that she was still struggling with the chow, saying there was hardly ever a vegetarian option, but that she knew that she would need the proteins to get help get her through the rigors of the physical training.
(When she left for boot camp, recruit Andrews was a vegetarian.)

She mentioned that she had become friends with a recruit from Virginia, PFC Reckley.
(Reckley, who she still stays in touch with, is a remarkable young woman who ended up being the platoon’s Honor Graduate.)

She went on to say that after free time the recruits get something called devotional prayer.
She mentioned that she can hear some of her fellow recruits still crying while this is going on, and how at the end all of the recruits are required to yell out AMEN!

She closed with telling us that she missed us and that she was going to write a letter to her recruiter letting him know how she was doing.

Marine Corps Boot Camp Letters 1

For the next few Throw Back Thursdays, I plan on re-printing letters we received from Holly when she was a recruit at Parris Island. This is the first of many. If you want to be sure to see more, subscribe to the blog and/or send a friend request.

In the first letter we received from PFC Andrews (she has since been promoted to Corporal)she told us that she only had an hour of free time so she wouldn’t be able to tell us everything that had happened since her arrival at MCRD Parris Island.

She mentioned that she had been appointed Scribe due to her having a Bachelors degree, and how a Drill Instructor had told her to go away when the D.I. found out that she thought it was a Friday when it actually turned out to be Saturday.

She mentioned, without going into detail (Sue and I knew) how she had received a little “special attention” for that one.

She then mentioned that recruits would not start being “quarterdecked” until Monday.

She then went on to tell us the results of her Initial Strength Test, and in addition to doing a 45 second flex arm hang and 65 crunches, she was third-fastest in her platoon in the running portion.

She mentioned how some of the females in her platoon were having trouble with the transition from civilian to Marine life, many of them complaining of homesickness and/or crying.

She said that she hoped it wouldn’t be too long before her body became accustomed to standing at attention as doing so for any length of time made her arms hurt.

Perhaps the biggest adjustment for recruit Andrews (who for years had been a vegetarian) was to her diet.

She wrote that she was no longer a vegetarian, the Corps was not really geared towards a meat-free diet, at that asking for boxed chow would make her stand out from the crowd, something she did not want to do.
She also mentioned that going back to eating meat hadn’t made her physically sick, something she had been concerned about.

She closed her first letter from Parris Island by asking us to send her the addresses of some relatives, and not to send her any stamps or envelopes just yet.

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